For Kids: Street Name Bugs!

IMG_6480For kids, one of the fun things about moving to a new home is getting an entirely new address; although it can be a little stressful, too. Here is an easy, creative way to help your child learn and celebrate your new street name: create Street Name Bugs! Or Street Name Aliens, or Street Name Robots, or Street Name Critters… you get the picture.

    All you will need is:

  • computer paper
  • a Sharpie
  • something to decorate with; can be dollar store watercolor paint, crayons,
    markers, or any combination of them.

Young children will need help with the first part, but when the name is turned into a “bug”, they can take it away! At that point, you will be reminded that there is nothing like a child’s creative eye.

You and your child are going to write the street name on a folded piece of paper; this needs a little adult help the first time. Cursive makes beautiful name creatures, but it’s a dying art that sometimes the kids are no longer taught. Printing makes cool name aliens and robots. Either is fun!

Step One:

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Fold a piece of paper lengthwise, keeping the folded part in toward your body. I tell kids to turn it so you can quack  like a duck.

It’s a great idea to have a piece of scratch paper underneath your folded paper.

 

Step Two:

Choose whether to write the name in cursive, or to print it neatly.  You are going to do this part with a Sharpie,  so it’s a great idea to keep an eye on the kids– Sharpie will not wash out.

For the example, I wanted to find an unusual name that kids might find difficult to remember and spell,  so I chose a name from a neighborhood called Glen Iris at Ballantrae, where Signature Homes is building gorgeous new homes.  One of the main streets in Glen Iris is: Kilkerran Drive.  yes, K-I-L-K-E-R-R-A-N. Kilkerran fits in perfectly with the Scottish influence of the neighborhood architecture; it’s even the name of a famous castle. But it isn’t the easiest name for kids to remember.

Whether you print or write cursive, the most important thing to do it to bring the letters all the way down to the fold of the paper, especially on the first and last letter.  Parents, one reason you may be needed the first time is because spacing can be tricky until you get the hang of it; you can do a dry run with pencil if you want to.

Here is Kilkerran both ways (ignore the strange looking “a” in the cursive version):

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Note how close we write the letter to the fold:

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Step Three

This is the trickiest step; after this it is all easy.  Flip over the folded paper and hold it up to a window; with that little bit of light shining through, you can see the image of the word.  Using the Sharpie, trace over the entire name. It will look strange!

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Step Four

Now the fun begins!  Open up the paper and see what you have!  Look for its personality.  Is it a monster? An alien? A strange insect? Turn it 180 degrees if you don’t see something and look at it from that perspective.  If something doesn’t jump right out at your child, help them look for what might be eyeballs– once you settle on the eyeballs, the rest comes easy sometimes.  Kids are usually way better at this than adults.

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Once you get the eyes placed, features start to become evident.  Add hands, antennae, hair, ears, nostrils, a mouth, shoes… just whatever your little creature needs to bring it alive.

Encourage your child to let his/her imagination run wild!

 

 

Step Five:

You will be amazed at how much the color will bring the personalities out of these little creations. Crayons or markers work great; or if your child loves to paint, nothing beats a strip of dollar store watercolors (but use water sparingly– encourage the kids to use a pretty dry brush on this thin paper). If you don’t know what something is on your creature, just start coloring the different sections and the ideas will start flowing. You can always add more details, too.
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Put on the finishing touches and enjoy your Street Name Bugs!  Can you recognize the name? If you want to fold the finished bug and look at it again, you can still recognize the root word in it, but when you open it up the magic happens.
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Feel free to pass this link along, and if you create a Street Name Bug, please email it to me at donna@arcarahomes.com.  I would love to create a gallery of wonderful bugs, aliens, robots, monsters, and other creatures.   It’s also fun to create bugs out of other names; some of my favorites have been from positive words to celebrate, such as JOY, HOPE, SMILE. And of course, celebrating your own name gives you a signature critter; you can scan it in, reduce it down, and use it as an avatar or strange signature.

Have fun and let me know what you think!

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Birmingham Area Homebuilders may be Poised for Comeback

The following article by Dawn Kent was in the Birmingham News on February 3, 2011.

Metro Birmingham homebuilders could be poised for a comeback in 2011, after a steep market downturn left most of the industry battered.

During a two-week period in January, more than 50 building permits were issued for speculative single-family homes in area neighborhoods, according to data collected by Southern Exposure, a Huntsville firm that tracks permit activity. That’s up from roughly 10 a week in recent months.

The sharp uptick might be the result of seasonal factors, said Bart Fletcher, executive officer of the Greater Birmingham Association of Home Builders.

If builders want to have houses ready for the typically busy spring buying season, now is the time they start working on them, he said.

But, Fletcher added, “I think builders are more optimistic about 2011. I think that we really believe we have seen the bottom. A lot of builders have not built anything new for quite some time. We’ve worked through the inventory.”

Still, hurdles remain for an overall recovery in home building, notably low consumer confidence and high unemployment, which make buyers wary.

Lending also continues to be tight, which means many builders can’t get financing for new projects.

That’s been true throughout the recession, Fletcher said, as a number of area homebuilders have exited the market. In early 2007, membership in the local homebuilders association peaked at 551; it is now down to about 245.

The group does not cover 100 percent of area home builders, he added, and some may not have officially closed their companies.

“Some may have dropped their membership, but their corporation remains intact,” Fletcher said. “They’re just not doing any work.”

To help put them back to work, the homebuilders association has been meeting with U.S. Rep. Spencer Bachus, chairman of the House Financial Services Committee, for help in communicating with regulators. The group is trying to determine where the brakes are being applied when it comes to lending in an effort to loosen the purse strings, Fletcher said.

“The type of lending environment that is necessary to keep small- to medium-size builders in business, that’s just not happening right now,” he said.

Despite such an environment, there are green shoots in the market.

In December, new single-family home sales rose 17.5 percent, the Commerce Department reported. It was a strong finish to a year that had the lowest total of new home sales on record, at 321,000, since the records started being kept in 1963, according to the National Association of Home Builders.

While discussing the sales rise, NAHB officials cited concern over declining inventory.

“.¤.¤. It means that the critical lack of acquisition, development and construction financing continues to pose a tremendous obstacle to medium- and small-sized builders across the country, thereby slowing the arrival of a true recovery and the jobs that could generate,” the group’s chief economist, David Crowe, said in a prepared statement.

According to local real estate analyst Tom Brander, the Birmingham area’s inventory of new homes for sale totaled 1,078 in December, a 14.6 percent decline from November.

By comparison, Brander’s statistics show the local new home inventory hovered around 3,300 in early 2007, before the market tanked.

Meanwhile, the vast majority of the 50-plus new home permits pulled in metro Birmingham from Jan. 7 to 21 are tied to Fort Worth, Texas-based home builder D.R. Horton.

As one of the nation’s largest homebuilders, publicly-traded D.R. Horton is in a better position to capitalize on a rebounding market, since it doesn’t have to rely on banks for financing individual projects, as smaller companies do.

Locally, D.R. Horton is building new homes in areas including Hoover, McCalla, Leeds, Moody and Pelham, according to the permit information collected by Southern Exposure.

Birmingham-based Signature Homes, which has continued to build and sell homes at a healthy clip throughout the recession, also accounted for a portion of the recent uptick in permits.

The company is working on four new communities, in addition to ongoing work in Hoover’s Ross Bridge and Chace Lake communities, said Chairman Dwight Sandlin and President Jonathan Belcher.

The new communities include Water’s Edge at Bent River, a Hoover neighborhood where homes start just below $200,000, and Miller Hill in Vestavia Hills, where lots are being developed and home prices are expected to range from the high $300,000s to the low $400,000s.

Signature Homes also is building in new communities in Calera and Chelsea.

Last year, the company’s home starts were up 40 percent over 2009, despite a drop off in the last half of the year that was caused by the expiration of last spring’s federal tax credits for homebuyers.

And so far this year, the company’s January sales are up 40 percent over the year-ago period.

“We’re looking for a really big year,” Sandlin said.

As for the area’s overall new home market, Sandlin points to declining inventory and says he expects builders to start filling in those gaps.

It’s moving toward a “new normal,” he added, nowhere near the super-heated housing market of 2005 and 2006, but toward the healthier levels of the early 2000s.

“There’s pretty good stuff going on,” he said. “It’s not great, but we’re headed in the right direction.”

All information on this website is deemed reliable, but not guaranteed, and may change without notice. Any square footage is approximate.

Property of Arcara Residential, LLC; 771 2nd Street; Helena, AL 35080