This Old House, Our New Office: One Wall

We are having a great time renovating the little brown house on 2nd Street in Old Town Helena… once again, we are hoping the Nunnally House will shine as an honor to its past and a wink to its future. As our banner says, we are making progress!

Our contractor, Miracle Bill, has continued to deliver; we now have a few working windows and a nice little counter at the entrance; the exterior of the house is patched and painted; Greg has tackled sheetrocking and trimming out the bathroom, and we have all painted inside until our arms were falling off. But this week, my forward progress has basically stopped because I’ve gotten bogged down on ONE WALL. And this week’s blog update will be short because I have spent all my time on that ONE WALL— an accent wall of very old planks that was buried beneath many layers of decades old paint.

office wall before and after stripping

The irony isn’t lost on me; working hard to put paint on most walls while working even harder to take paint off another!

But there is just something about that old barn wood; those old planks that are rough, old, and hand-cut. Underneath the five layers of old paint, there was character, and I wanted to find it. A little paint stripper, a lot of elbow grease, a layer of wax varnish and a coffee colored glaze, and more time than I will admit to, and here are the before and afters. Was it worth it? We would love to hear what you think.  (greg@arcarahomes.com or donna@arcarahomes.com).

office wall after

Products used: Sher-Wood glaze by Sherwin Williams, hand sander with #40 abrasive disk, Polyvine wax finish, and a good face mask, gloves, and eye cover. (Use the paint stripper in a very well ventilated area, and clean excess stripper with paint thinner, taking care not to allow these products to touch your skin.)

This Old House, Our New Office: Termites and Beyond

termite blog feature

What’s going on with that little brown house on 2nd Street in Old Town Helena? You know, the one that sat on the market for 1500 days, a little saggy, a lot crumbly, and almost forgotten… it has now been properly adopted and will soon be the home of our Real Estate office, Arcara Residential. We are having a wonderful adventure renovating it!

Here is a general update (our third blog entry) for those following our progress; but, first, a mystery we would love to have anyone from Helena help us solve.

The History Mystery

One quick conversation with Helena historian Ken Penhale offered the first clue to finding the history of the little brown house; it was called “the Nunnally House” and had been owned for decades by Luther Nunnally, including when the tornado struck in 1933. As a genealogist, I went to ancestry.com to see whether Luther Nunnally was being chased by any descendants, and I hit the jackpot when I was able to contact his wonderful granddaughter, Dawn. Since making that connection, for us the house has come alive; we think of it as Grace and Luther’s house, and as we renovate, we are trying to be very respectful of the fact that our new office used to be a family home. In fact, the home as it stands today was built by the Nunnally family; whatever structure was there before the 1933 tornado had to be rebuilt using the salvaged old lumber from the original home, partially standing but roofless, and thankfully the Nunnallys boasted talented carpenters in their family. This is the Nunnally House.

fireplace and chimneyBut, still; we know there is more to the story of this old house and we are obsessed with going back further.  When we cut away a large area of paneling above the fireplace, we were struck by how very old the chimney looks to be; it evokes a history that surely predates the 20th century. With the house being on the National Registry of Historic Places, I am making it my mission to find out its deep history. And I need help; I have spent hours pouring over the old deed books and tax records in the dusty rooms at the Shelby County Courthouse and the Tax Assessor’s offices; I found some cool things! But I haven’t so far found anything that would tell us who first built the pre-tornado house or when. If you know of any Helena historians who like a good challenge, please refer them to my Nunnally House research and pass along my email address: donna@arcarahomes.com.  I want to know the rest of the story.

Renovation Update: Varmints

screwdriver in rotten beamTermites! Spiders! Wasps and hornets! Ants galore! Who wants to visit a business with those as the inhabitants?  Those little critters have wreaked havoc on the Nunnally House and they must be made to pay. The obvious worst enemy has been the termites; they are no longer active underneath the house, but their march of destruction was ridiculous. We knew we had trouble ahead the instant my brother was able to easily jab a screwdriver through one of the main support beams; bottom line is that everything had to come out.

all floors out

Thankfully we have a wonderful, talented (and patient) contractor helping us; (his name is Bill Carroll, Central Alabama Homecrafters, 205-312-8317). Bill and his crew were able to install new floor joists and a solid subfloor, so now we can safely claim that our clients won’t fall into the crawl space. Several cans of wasp spray, some heavy stomping, and we are making progress.

spider

If you suffer from Arachnaphobia, as I do, you will not enjoy seeing our largest inhabitant, Charlene, who had made her ancient nest on our ceiling and was planning Helena’s scariest Halloween Party. (Rest in Peace, Charlene).
Now, in the words of Tangeena, from Poltergeist: “This house is clean.”

The colorssherwin williams color palette

The ugly little brown termite-infested house will soon be no more. In fact, as we have test-painted a small section in our new colors, by contrast the original color looks almost pink! Being in the historic district, we had to stay within the approved palette of earth tones; we would love to know what you think about the exterior colors we will be using:
• Main color: (Sherwin Williams) Colonial Revival Green Stone
• Trim color: (Sherwin Williams) Alabaster
• Door color: (Sherwin Williams) Aurora Brown
• Porch Floor color: (Sherwin Williams) Urbane Bronze

The Wood

barn door

You may have heard screeches of mourning from the house; those would be from our loud realization that the original hardwood floors absolutely could NOT BE SAVED. Yes, a few splintered pieces will be repurposed; but for the most part, we have had to accept this fact and move on. The loss of the original floors hurt our feelings, but we are thrilled that most walls are the original planks, full of weathered stories.

As for those very old floor joists: a good bit of the wonderful heart of pine wood could be reclaimed and we have great plans to build a conference room table and a vanity top for the bathroom from them. Our miracle worker, Bill Carroll, has already built a beautiful barn door for our conference room from the wood. Take that, termites!

 

Looking Old

As much as we want everything to be reclaimed and authentic, we will also have to occasionally turn to new resources to blend in with the “old look” in keeping with the home. We decided to paint the 1960’s wood paneling in the big room (wrong decade). We are tweaking the baseboards and crown moulding, adding new where needed, so it will all be matching, simple 1”x6” trim throughout the entire house. And through the talents of Miracle Bill, we are adding several old-looking decorative beams to the ceilings. Before and after photos coming soon!

Here is a tip I learned for making new wood look old; from here, you could distress it, splatter it, paint it, and generally throw stuff at it to give it character.  To age new wood:  First, paint the wood with a very strong brew of tea and coffee, and let dry.  Second, go over that with a layer of the special brew described as follows: a big chunk of a steel wool pad, steeped in vinegar for at least 24 hours.  Within just a few minutes, you will be amazed at how much the new wood becomes old in appearance!

wood aging

To Be Continued…

There is much to be done and not many “after” photos to show yet, but we will get there soon. Having the delightful neighbors we have met, the wonderful food to enjoy right up the street, the sights of Buck Creek, and the nostalgic sounds of the trains coming down the track make this project a joy to take on. We love Helena!

 

This Old House, Our New Office: Chapter 1.

It was just meant to be.

Nunnally house in august 2015For years, the sweet, neglected little bungalow style house beckoned to Greg Arcara every time he drove through Old Town Helena. Not on Main Street, but right down there on 2nd Street, sitting quietly under the shade of an overgrown tree; the For Sale sign perched in the yard for 1500 days. To a career Realtor like Greg Arcara, that fact alone screamed “damaged goods”; and none of the words coming back from his inquiry surprised him: Foreclosure. Termites. Busted pipes. Questionable support beams. Needs a lot of work. Greg heard those pragmatic words, but they couldn’t cancel out a hunch that whispered into his other ear: This house has a story.

Greg knew that one day he wanted an inviting, comfortable place for our (purposefully) small Real Estate company, Arcara Residential. He wanted a place with a friendly front porch and a lot of character, where people can feel at ease and where he can enjoy becoming a part of a close knit town, specifically Helena. He wanted a place where his agents would look forward to coming to meet with clients or catch up on paperwork. So… he has now officially bought this fixer-upper. The home is not much to look at yet, but we expect to thoroughly enjoy renovating and rescuing it. Think, This Old House meets Our New Office. We want to document the adventure as we go, passing along anything interesting we encounter, including project successes and epic fails. Maybe there will even be some ideas that fellow renovators will enjoy reading about. Please feel free to follow us on our journey!

The History of The Nunnally House

Knowing that this home is part of Old Town Helena’s designation in the National Register of Historical Places, we feel strongly that we need to learn as much as possible about the history of the house; we want to be good custodians of what was once a beloved home for a few generations. We are off to a great start, with the first discovery that the home once had a name: The Nunnally House. To our delight, Nunnally family members have been absolutely wonderful to us and willing to help us learn more about their family home. We are working on tracing back further to learn more about when it was built—we’re thinking 1880’s timeframe—and who built the original home, even before Luther and Grace McClendon Nunnally lived out their lives in the house. Helena residents will know that the house was originally located up the road a piece, close to the current Post Office, and was moved to its current spot a few years ago. We will share our discoveries as these walls begin to talk. Being located within an easy walk of Ken Penhale’s Helena Museum may prove to be perfect. I can say for sure that being within an easy walk of the wonderful Coal Yard restaurant has its appeal, as well; we are already “regulars”.

It Was Meant To Be

One important chapter will already be familiar to anyone who has a passing interest in Helena’s history: the tornado. On May 5, 1933, a catastrophic tornado destroyed much of Helena, resulting in many lives lost and a town forever changed. One of the heavily damaged structures was the original Nunnally home.

Here is where the story gets personal.

My grandmother’s (Ollie Smith Garner) family home in Adamsville, Jefferson County, was completely demolished by a pre-dawn tornado when she was a teenager; several family members were injured, her baby brother Fred was picked up by the tornado and dumped into a field far away, (alive but injured), and she got caught in the wind’s fury with her arms wrapped around a big oak tree, struggling against the roaring winds to make it to the storm shelter. The horrifying event marked her for life. Fear of storms became one of the overriding elements that influenced the way my grandmother lived her life, every day; she could barely have a long conversation without the topic coming up, many decades after the storm, until the day she passed away at almost a hundred years old. The last coherent conversation I had with her before her death in 2011 was about her tornado experience, which I had just written a story about (A Pretty Red Dress).

It was the same tornado.

Yes, amazingly, we have now verified that the same tornado that destroyed Shelby County’s Helena went on to unleash its terror on Jefferson County’s Adamsville. That 1933 tornado got both the Nunnally home and the Smith home, more than thirty miles apart. Something about that shared experience makes me feel very connected to the Nunnally House; many of the boards we will be working hard to reclaim and repurpose will have survived that May 1933 terror, “Mama Ollie’s” tornado. The Smiths survived; the Nunnallys survived; the story continues.

It sure feels that this was simply meant to be.

Current Pictures

Here is our starting point; crops growing in the gutter, wasp nests lurking under the swing, shadows of painted images peering from the porch floor… and all that is before even opening the front door. A lot of fun and elbow grease awaits. We would love to hear what you think as we go along!

Birmingham Area Homebuilders may be Poised for Comeback

The following article by Dawn Kent was in the Birmingham News on February 3, 2011.

Metro Birmingham homebuilders could be poised for a comeback in 2011, after a steep market downturn left most of the industry battered.

During a two-week period in January, more than 50 building permits were issued for speculative single-family homes in area neighborhoods, according to data collected by Southern Exposure, a Huntsville firm that tracks permit activity. That’s up from roughly 10 a week in recent months.

The sharp uptick might be the result of seasonal factors, said Bart Fletcher, executive officer of the Greater Birmingham Association of Home Builders.

If builders want to have houses ready for the typically busy spring buying season, now is the time they start working on them, he said.

But, Fletcher added, “I think builders are more optimistic about 2011. I think that we really believe we have seen the bottom. A lot of builders have not built anything new for quite some time. We’ve worked through the inventory.”

Still, hurdles remain for an overall recovery in home building, notably low consumer confidence and high unemployment, which make buyers wary.

Lending also continues to be tight, which means many builders can’t get financing for new projects.

That’s been true throughout the recession, Fletcher said, as a number of area homebuilders have exited the market. In early 2007, membership in the local homebuilders association peaked at 551; it is now down to about 245.

The group does not cover 100 percent of area home builders, he added, and some may not have officially closed their companies.

“Some may have dropped their membership, but their corporation remains intact,” Fletcher said. “They’re just not doing any work.”

To help put them back to work, the homebuilders association has been meeting with U.S. Rep. Spencer Bachus, chairman of the House Financial Services Committee, for help in communicating with regulators. The group is trying to determine where the brakes are being applied when it comes to lending in an effort to loosen the purse strings, Fletcher said.

“The type of lending environment that is necessary to keep small- to medium-size builders in business, that’s just not happening right now,” he said.

Despite such an environment, there are green shoots in the market.

In December, new single-family home sales rose 17.5 percent, the Commerce Department reported. It was a strong finish to a year that had the lowest total of new home sales on record, at 321,000, since the records started being kept in 1963, according to the National Association of Home Builders.

While discussing the sales rise, NAHB officials cited concern over declining inventory.

“.¤.¤. It means that the critical lack of acquisition, development and construction financing continues to pose a tremendous obstacle to medium- and small-sized builders across the country, thereby slowing the arrival of a true recovery and the jobs that could generate,” the group’s chief economist, David Crowe, said in a prepared statement.

According to local real estate analyst Tom Brander, the Birmingham area’s inventory of new homes for sale totaled 1,078 in December, a 14.6 percent decline from November.

By comparison, Brander’s statistics show the local new home inventory hovered around 3,300 in early 2007, before the market tanked.

Meanwhile, the vast majority of the 50-plus new home permits pulled in metro Birmingham from Jan. 7 to 21 are tied to Fort Worth, Texas-based home builder D.R. Horton.

As one of the nation’s largest homebuilders, publicly-traded D.R. Horton is in a better position to capitalize on a rebounding market, since it doesn’t have to rely on banks for financing individual projects, as smaller companies do.

Locally, D.R. Horton is building new homes in areas including Hoover, McCalla, Leeds, Moody and Pelham, according to the permit information collected by Southern Exposure.

Birmingham-based Signature Homes, which has continued to build and sell homes at a healthy clip throughout the recession, also accounted for a portion of the recent uptick in permits.

The company is working on four new communities, in addition to ongoing work in Hoover’s Ross Bridge and Chace Lake communities, said Chairman Dwight Sandlin and President Jonathan Belcher.

The new communities include Water’s Edge at Bent River, a Hoover neighborhood where homes start just below $200,000, and Miller Hill in Vestavia Hills, where lots are being developed and home prices are expected to range from the high $300,000s to the low $400,000s.

Signature Homes also is building in new communities in Calera and Chelsea.

Last year, the company’s home starts were up 40 percent over 2009, despite a drop off in the last half of the year that was caused by the expiration of last spring’s federal tax credits for homebuyers.

And so far this year, the company’s January sales are up 40 percent over the year-ago period.

“We’re looking for a really big year,” Sandlin said.

As for the area’s overall new home market, Sandlin points to declining inventory and says he expects builders to start filling in those gaps.

It’s moving toward a “new normal,” he added, nowhere near the super-heated housing market of 2005 and 2006, but toward the healthier levels of the early 2000s.

“There’s pretty good stuff going on,” he said. “It’s not great, but we’re headed in the right direction.”

7 Ways to Prevent Water Damage

Gary Davis  from Farmer’s Insurance  shared the following tips about preventing household water damage.

Did you know? Ninety percent of household damage is the result of water damage and flooding.  Broken water pipes are a major contributor to that figure. Electronic items are destroyed. Rugs, curtains and clothes are ruined. Electric shock risk is dramatically increased. At the very least, you’ll spend days cleaning up the mess, getting rid of the resulting mildew smell and getting your pipes fixed so you can resume your water service.

7 Ways to Prevent Water Damage

  1. Check your water heater annually for rust or leaks.
  2. Replace washing machine hoses every five years.
  3. Check washing machine control valves every five years.
  4. Locate the turn-off valve for your city water supply. Learn how to operate it.
  5. If your water bill is abnormally high for no apparent reason, do a complete inspection of your water system.
  6. Do not pour grease of any kind down your sink or disposal.
  7. Winterize outside water faucets during freezing weather and disconnect outside garden hoses from the faucet.

 

For more information, Gary Davis suggests visiting this link – http://www.farmers.com/flood_damage.html

8 Worst First-Time Home Buyer Mistakes 2010

This very current article by Amy Fontinelle describes eight mistakes commonly  made by first time home buyers:
Aug 3, 2010

Are you gearing up to buy your first place? Shopping for a home is exciting, exhausting and a little bit scary. In the end, your aim is to end up with a home you love at a price you can afford. Sounds simple enough, right? Unfortunately, many people make mistakes the prevent them from achieving this simple dream. Arm yourself with these tips to get the most out of your purchase and avoid making 8 of the most costly mistakes that could put a hold on that sold sign.

1. Not Knowing What You Can Afford

As we’ve all learned from the subprime mortgage mess, what the bank says you can afford and what you know you can afford or are comfortable with paying are not necessarily the same. If you don’t already have a budget, make a list of all your monthly expenses (excluding rent), including vehicle costs, student loan payments, credit card payments, groceries, health insurance, retirement savings and so on. Don’t forget major expenses that only occur once a year, like any insurance premiums you pay annually or annual vacations. Subtract this total from your take-home pay and you’ll know how much you can spend on your new home each month.
If you end up looking at homes that are outside your price range, you’ll end up lusting after something you can’t afford, which can put you in the dangerous position of trying to stretch beyond your means financially or cause you to feel unsatisfied with what you actually can afford. You may even learn that you can’t afford the type or size of home that you desire and that you need to work on reducing your monthly expenses and/or increasing your income before you even start looking.

2. Skipping Mortgage Qualification

What you think you can afford and what the bank is willing to lend you may not match up, especially if you have poor credit or unstable income, so make sure to get pre-approved for a loan before placing an offer on a home. If you don’t, you’ll be wasting the seller’s time, the seller’s agent’s time, and your agent’s time if you sign a contract and then discover later that the bank won’t lend you what you need, or that it’s only willing to give you a mortgage that you find unacceptable.
Be aware that even if you have been pre-approved for a mortgage, your loan can fall through at the last minute if you do something to alter your credit score, like finance a car purchase. If you cause the deal to fall through, you may have to forfeit the several thousand dollars that you put up when you went under contract.

3. Failing to Consider Additional Expenses

Once you’re a homeowner, you’ll have additional expenses on top of your monthly payment. Unlike when you were a renter, you’ll be responsible for paying property taxes, insuring your home against disasters and making any repairs the house needs (which will occasionally include expensive items like a new roof or a new furnace).
If you’re interested in purchasing a condo, you’ll have to pay maintenance costs monthly regardless of whether anything needs fixing because you’ll be part of a homeowner’s association, which collects a couple hundred dollars a month from the owners of each unit in the building in the form of condominium fees.

4. Being Too Picky

Go ahead and put everything you can think of on your new home wish list, but don’t be so inflexible that you end up continuing to rent for significantly longer than you really want to. First-time homebuyers often have to compromise on something because their funds are limited. You may have to live on a busy street, accept outdated decor, make some repairs to the home, or forgo that extra bedroom. Of course, you can always choose to continue renting until you can afford everything on your list – you’ll just have to decide how important it is for you to become a homeowner now rather than in a couple of years.

5. Lacking Vision

Even if you can’t afford to replace the hideous wallpaper in the bathroom now, it might be worth it to live with the ugliness for a while in exchange for getting into a house you can afford. If the home otherwise meets your needs in terms of the big things that are difficult to change, such as location and size, don’t let physical imperfections turn you away. Besides, doing home upgrades yourself, even when you have to hire a contractor, is often cheaper than paying the increased home value to a seller who has already done the work for you.

6. Being Swept Away

Minor upgrades and cosmetic fixes are inexpensive tricks are a seller’s dream for playing on your emotions and eliciting a much higher price tag. Sellers may pay $2,000 for minimal upgrades or staging that you’ll end up paying $40,000 for. If you’re on a budget, look for homes whose full potential has yet to be realized. Also, first-time homebuyers should always look for a house they can add value to, as this ensures a bump in equity to help you up the property ladder.

7. Compromising on the Important Things

Don’t get a two-bedroom home when you know you’re planning to have kids and will want three bedrooms. By the same token, don’t buy a condo just because it’s cheaper when one of the main reasons you’re over apartment life is because you hate sharing walls with neighbors. It’s true that you’ll probably have to make some compromises to be able to afford your first home, but don’t make a compromise that will be a major strain.

8. Neglecting to Inspect

It’s tempting to think that you’re a homeowner the moment you go into escrow, but not so fast – before you close on the sale, you need to know what kind of shape the house is in. You don’t want to get stuck with a money pit or with the headache of performing a lot of unexpected repairs. Keeping your feelings in check until you have a full picture of the house’s physical condition and the soundness of your potential investment will help you avoid making a serious financial mistake.

Conclusion

Buying a first home can seem stressful and overwhelming, and it isn’t without its share of potential pitfalls. If you’re aware of those issues ahead of time, you can protect yourself from costly mistakes and shop with confidence.
For many people, a home is the largest purchase they will ever make, but it need not be the most difficult.

Why Smart Homebuyers Hire Home Inspectors

From our hero, Dave Ramsey:

Home inspections are an indispensable part of the home-buying process. Buying a home without one is the same as buying a car without even kicking the tires.

Any good real estate agent will recommend you include a home inspection clause when you make an offer on a house. That usually means you’ll be paying for the inspection, so you need to know what you’re getting for your money.

The Value of a Home Inspector

A qualified home inspector combs a property’s visible and accessible areas to identify any health and safety problems, positive or negative conditions of the property and any conditions that need further specialized attention.

An inspection includes structural elements such as the roof, foundation, walls, windows, doors, insulation, basement or crawlspace and attic. Electrical, plumbing, heating and cooling systems are also part of a home inspection. It can even include examination of appliances and should also report any evidence of termites.

Once the inspection is complete, a home inspector provides a written, comprehensive report detailing any issues with the home.

Some important things to remember about home inspection reports:

  • No home is perfect. It is not uncommon for a report to include 50 or more issues.
  • This is not “pass” or “fail.” The inspection gives you the information you need to decide whether or not to buy the home “as is” or negotiate with the seller to either fix (some of) the problems or reduce the price.
  • This is not a warranty. The report identifies issues found the day of inspection and cannot predict problems that may arise a few months or a few days down the road.

You Are Not A Home Inspector

Home inspection is another one of those jobs best left to professionals. Few of us have the expertise to identify electrical, plumbing and structural problems. Combine that with the emotional factors of buying a home, and it’s easy to see why potential buyers are not the ones who need to do the inspecting.

With that said, it’s a good idea to accompany your home inspector so you can ask questions and see the good and not-so-good for yourself.

How to Find a Good Inspector

Your real estate agent can guide you to a website that has a list of licensed home inspector in your state.  If you’d rather choose your own, be aware that only about half the states have licensing or certification requirements. In either case, you want an inspector with plenty of experience. Check out the American Society of Home Inspectors, www.ashi.org, for more information on selecting an inspector.

Home inspection fees vary but are usually well under $1,000. Considering how much an inspection can save you by avoiding potential disasters, it’s money well spent.

Easy Ways to Increase Home Value

Courtesy of our hero, Dave Ramsey:

Set yourself up to reap the most value when you sell

When it comes time to sell your house, one of the worst mistakes you can make is to think your home’s appearance won’t affect its value. Take some time to spruce it up so you can sell it for the best possible price. Think about the following projects:

Landscape it
First impressions are everything, and your yard is no exception. Your curb appeal could be the difference between a drive-by and a stop and stare! Most people make a decision whether or not they want to go inside the house during the moment in which they first glance at the home. Trim back hedges so windows are visible, weed and mulch flower beds to increase contrast, and edge and trim your lawn to add a clean look to the front of your house.

Coat it
Give your house a facelift with a new coat of paint. A gallon of paint goes a long way and only costs you around $15 per can. If you want to save even more money, paint the house yourself. You will be amazed by the difference a new coat of paint will make for your home’s appearance and value.

Repair it
Squeaky hinges, rusty door knobs, leaky faucets, and wobbly banisters—just a few of the things a screwdriver and a little grease can fix. You can fix these small problems without having to pay big bucks for an inspector. Do little things around the house to get big results.

Clean it
Cleaning your house may seem like common sense, but you may be surprised how uncommon it is for homeowners to declutter the home before it goes on the market! A messy home is one quick way to scare people off and kick dirt on the price. Host a garage sale for unused furniture and other items you don’t need that are taking up space. Dust off the mantle, and store books and CDs that aren’t being used. Create a clean feel in your home, and you’ll enhance its value.

These types of do-it-yourself projects are inexpensive and can produce quick results. If you do these things, you will set yourself up to reap the most value when it comes time to sell your home.

from daveramsey.com on 29 Jun 2010

Our First Realtor Open House was a Huge Success!

Arcara Residential’s first Realtor open house was a HUGE success today.  The attendance was better than we had anticipated with about 100 realtors in attendance.  A fabulous Chinese Buffet was served and the attendance was so great we had to pick up more food.  Each agent received a fortune cookie after lunch to open with a total of $700 in prize money hidden inside.  Congratulation to Seth Underwood who won a $100 prize and to the other 50 agents also won money.  The feedback on this gated community was very positive.  Over heard were comments like, “great location”, “beautiful crafted homes”, “great value”, and “I have got to sell one of these”.  Thank you to Wayne and Susan Duke, the Arcara Residential agents at Brooke’s Crossings, whose hard work made this event a huge success and to all the agents who attended the event.

Arcara Residential – First Closing!

We were thrilled to have our first closing at Arcara Residential today!

Pictured from left to right are Arcara Residential agent Tom Becker, closing Attorney Shan Paden, Greg Arcara, Keller Williams Buyer’s Agent Sharon Ryder, and Purchaser Travis Hull.

This was first for many of us today. Tom was the first Arcara Residential agent to write a contract at the company and the first agent to close a home. Travis Hull the buyer is attending UAB medical school and this is his first home. His wife is back home in Penn and about to give birth to their first child in about 2 weeks. She will be moving down with the baby after the birth. This was also a first for the Keller Williams agent Sharon Ryder. She has just returned to real estate after a 2 year absence and this is her first closing since coming back into the business. Travis bought a new HPH home in Black Creek Station.

All information on this website is deemed reliable, but not guaranteed, and may change without notice. Any square footage is approximate.

Property of Arcara Residential, LLC; 771 2nd Street; Helena, AL 35080